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tumblr llcw71K5md1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Nike Billboard in NYC

Yesterday you said tomorrow

tumblr lln5jqiRBI1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Kill Bill Billboard in NYC – Bloody Mess

tumblr lln5opCDu71qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Realhiphop.com.br Outdoor Advertising

tumblr llnx22X4Vw1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Sony PSP Transparant Billboard Advertising

tumblr lm60gmbhB81qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
McDonald’s free coffee promotion.

tumblr lmdzgyOBji1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Mondo Pasta Boat Advertising

tumblr lnguymJuNy1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
The first ever plant billboard. Coca-Cola and WWF have unveiled a new 60-by-60-foot billboard in the Philippines that’s covered in Fukien tea plants, which absorb air pollution.

tumblr ln8kcvEQIL1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Allstate Insurance: Marina Tower

tumblr ln2yfzDmT41qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Powerhouse Gym Outdoor Ad

tumblr ln2xmoqdLG1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Oltimer Restaurants – Special Poster for “Oldtimer”, a big Austrian chain for motorway rest stops

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Why is Ad Blocking Suddenly so Popular? + [INFOGRAPHIC]

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Ad blocking has existed for several years now, but has been adopted by millions of Internet users in the past several months. There were only 120,000 ad blocking users in January 2010, and in the past few months, ad blocking has increased by over a million users every month, which we tracked through the Chrome and Firefox webstores. This is a much higher rate than ever before. Why is this happening? Why now?

 

Let’s try to isolate all our variables in this ad-blocking equation. We have:

 

a) the actual ads (quality and type)

Have ads changed much over the past several years? It seems to me that ads have remained constant, with some sites presenting obtrusive, loud and animated ads, while other sites present more conservative ads. With the exception of video ads, which are relatively new, the spectrum of online advertising has not changed much. So, a change in the actual ads must not be a cause of the rise in ad blocking.

b) internet users

Have the Internet users changed over the past two or three years? There are two possible ways that Internet users changed. Either they have become fed up with the same old advertising. Or, they have seen so much Internet content, that they now feel entitled to ad-free content. Most likely, both of these are causes.

c) browsers and web-stores

Many internet users are migrating to Google Chrome from Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox. Now, Chrome has over 35% of the browser market share (Source:StatCounter). Chrome has a super-effective web-store, with thousands of extensions available. More people are installing extensions now than ever before, and this inevitably leads to an increase in ad-blocking users.

d) ad-blocking technology

Has ad-blocking technology changed? AdBlock still blocks ads, as usual. But in order for AdBlock to have gained momentum, it needed to reach a critical mass. AdBlock technology is based on rules, which allowed it to become more effective as more users installed it (network effect). Only then, it provided enough value for its end-users, which then lead to a huge rise in downloads.

The result:

 

Many people seem to have a strong opinion on this subject matter; what’s yours?

Jacob

 

P.S. Check out dsero.com to recover revenue from ad-blocking users on your site! Anti-AdBlock is here.

5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

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5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

The power of online marketing on a social web has only scratched the surface of its full potential.

This year smart marketers will stop using content as a bullhorn and start using it as a platform for building engaged communities. Customers will no longer be seen simply as a source of revenue, but instead as a near endless stream of research, innovation, and sales.

This transition will mean targeted communities that are smaller and more social than the mass media audiences of the past will succeed like never before. Therefore, content will have to be focused, refined, interactive, shareable, and (most importantly) involve the audience in the creation process.

To get you ready for these important changes, here are five top tips for content marketing success:

#1. Bring the Customers Inside

Customers want businesses to solve their problems and are willing participants in that value creation process… if given the chance. Unfortunately, much of what we call “social” media marketing has hardly lived up to its name.

The key will be to move beyond the mass marketing mentality of “us vs. them.”

By empowering your customers to become part of your business processes you’ll get a great low-cost source of research & innovation.

There’s also no greater sales force in the world than a satisfied customer. And while this was once an added bonus for marketers, it’s quickly becoming a necessity. Customers increasingly vet their purchasing decisions through social networks before even considering a company’s traditional marketing.

Some things to try:

  • Ask for customer input on new projects you’re working on.
  • Allow customers to tell their own stories through co-created content (see below).
  • Create incentives (social and financial) for customers to become evangelists of your business.
  • Make sure to show that you are actually using the feedback you receive.

#2.  Focus, Focus, Focus

In the mass marketing era, half of the advertising was wasted but we just don’t know which half.

The Internet has created an ultra-segmented marketplace, which allows smart marketers to create specialized content that solves specific problems.

To be successful, your content has to be focused on a well-defined niche audience. Take the time to map out exactly who you are targeting by developing a detailed profile of your audience, including demographics, psychographics, and a thorough understanding of how they negotiate their social space.

#3. Get Organized

Most people classify content by format (blog, video, Tweet, etc.), often leading to repetitiveness and a sense by your audience that you’re shouting at them (rather than talking with them).

Why don’t you try a different framework, one that will give you a much clearer look at the role each piece of content plays in driving interaction within your community.

When you are planning out your editorial calendar, separate content into one of three categories, defined by how that piece of content was created:

  • Original content – This is material created directly by you. It should address a specific customer need – be that information, instruction, humor, motivation, etc. Use it as a way to highlight your expertise, make yourself useful, and build trust with your audience.
  • Co-created content – Created together with others. In particular, you should target influencers within the niche who can help build your authority. Examples of this are guest posts like this one, a webinar highlighting the successes of your top customers, or a podcast with someone who has expertise that complements your own.
  • Curated content – Created by others but useful in some way to your audience. This includes stuff like retweets or emailing your list with a useful report that was created by another organization.

Reframing your thinking in this way will force you to always keep in mind the business purpose behind everything you create and share.

#4. Get Emotional

In his awesome book Contagious, Wharton professor Jonah Berger showed us that one of the key reasons people share content online is because it arouses a person’s emotion.

Content has to go beyond just being useful; it has to be unforgettable. Rather than trying to churn out quantity, take the time to figure out what kind of emotions move your audience.

In doing so, it’s important to remember that not all emotion is created equal. In his research, Berger identifies that certain kinds of emotions – those that get people “aroused” like awe, passion, and anger – are much more likely to drive shares than those that make people feel toned down – like sadness, relaxation, or contentment.

Ultimately, don’t be afraid to rock the boat a bit, because what gets one person excited might turn another one away. As long as you are exciting the right people (and treating everyone well in the process), it’s ok to let some people go.

#5. Respect the Numbers but Don’t be a Machine

There are so many tools out there that allow you to use data to paint a picture of your social landscape. So many in fact that it can turn into a hindrance if you’re not careful.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s absolutely crucial to analyze and optimize, but all the data in the world won’t do you a bit of good if you don’t understand people.

And one of the most important things to understand about people is that they change. Often. Data can be an important tool for measuring these changes – it can help you test assumptions and sometimes provide a needed reality check. But it’s no replacement for digging in and becoming part of your customer community.

So, make the effort to really get to know your customers. Instead of just mass emailings and webinars, take time to have individual conversations. Understand what people are struggling with and you’ll have a near endless stream of ideas for new content to create.

The Big Picture

The world of marketing is changing, and I would argue it’s for the better. By harnessing the power of community, businesses are ending the awful competition between buyer and seller, replacing it with a much healthier process of mutual value creation.

In 2014 the kind of guesswork that has long been the way marketers figure out what their audience wants will be replaced by actually getting to know the customers themselves. By talking with them instead of at them, we can start to create a new way of doing business, one that helps bring people together to solve the problems of our day.

You now have the framework to get started. Use it to go out and build yourself a dynamic, engaged, and profitable community in 2014.

Guest author: Jake Parent has been building communities for more than a decade. His site Learn To Be Heard teaches marketers and entrepreneurs how to use blogging and other social media to transform an audience of static listeners into a dynamic group of engaged participants. 

 

 

Want to learn how to make your blog and content a success with social media marketing?

My book – “Blogging the Smart Way – How to Create and Market a Killer Blog with Social Media” – will show you how.

It is now available to download. I show you how to create and build a blog that rocks and grow tribes, fans and followers on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. It also includes dozens of tips to create contagious content that begs to be shared and tempts people to link to your website and blog.

I also reveal the tactics I used to grow my Twitter followers to over 185,000.

Download and read it now.

 

 
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Read more at http://www.jeffbullas.com/2014/01/06/5-top-tips-for-content-marketing-success/#gXrHFDd6JuY4t6Uy.99

Malware Attack Hits Thousands Of Visitors To Yahoo.com

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Marissa Mayer

Paul Morigi/Getty Images

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer

Two internet security firms have warned that hundreds of thousands of Yahoo.com visitors may have encountered malware from Yahoo’s advertising servers, The Washington Post reports.

In a blog post on Friday, Netherlands-based Fox-IT wrote that it “detected and investigated the infection of clients after they visited yahoo.com.” Some advertisements displayed to Yahoo visitors — which are served from ads.yahoo.com – were malicious iframes, hosted on a number of domains, the firm reported.

From The Washington Post:

Ashkan Soltani, a security researcher and Washington Post contributor, alerted me to the issue. Often, he says, such attacks are “the result of hacking an existing ad network. But there’s another possibility, he says. The culprits may have simply submitted the malicious software as ordinary ads, sneaking past Yahoo’s system for filtering out malicious submissions.

The fact that the malware targeted flaws in the Java programming environment is an important reminder that the software has become a security menace. When it was created almost two decades ago, the Java programming language was hailed as a way to make Web sites more interactive. But it has been largely superseded for this purpose by technologies like Flash and JavaScript.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/yahoo-malware-attack-2014-1#ixzz2pY2D88hE

Inbound marketing From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Components of Inbound Marketing

Components of Inbound Marketing (Photo credit: Gavin Llewellyn)

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Data Matrix, encoding the text: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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English: MaxiCode encoding of the text “Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”. Intended to replace :Image:UPS_MaxiCode_example.png (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Inbound marketing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the synonymous term coined by Seth Godin, see Permission marketing. For the product management sense of Inbound Marketing, see Product management.

Inbound marketing is advertising a company through blogspodcastsvideoeBooksenewsletterswhitepapersSEOsocial media marketing, and other forms of content marketing which serve to bring customers in closer to the brand, where they want to be.[1][2][3] In contrast, buying attention,[1] cold-calling, direct paper mailradio, TV advertisements,[2] sales flyers, spamtelemarketing[3] and traditional advertising[4] are considered “outbound marketing”. Inbound marketing earns the attention of customers,[1] makes the company easy to be found[2] and draws customers to the website[4] by producing interesting content.[3]

David Meerman Scott recommends that marketers “earn their way in” (via publishing helpful information on a blog etc.) in contrast to outbound marketing where they “buy, beg, or bug their way in” (via paid advertisements, issuing press releases, or paying commissioned sales people, respectively).[5] The term is synonymous with the concept of permission marketing, which is the title of a book by Seth Godin.[3] The inbound marketing term was coined by HubSpot’s Brian Halligan,[2][3][6] in 2005.[7][8] According to HubSpot, inbound marketing is especially effective for small businesses[9] that deal with high dollar values, long research cycles and knowledge-based products. In these areas prospects are more likely to get informed and hire someone who demonstrates expertise.[10]

In one case inbound marketing was defined by three phases: Get found, Convert and Analyze.[1] A newer model from Business2Community illustrates the concept in five stages:[7]

  1. Attract traffic
  2. Convert visitors to leads
  3. Convert leads to sales
  4. Turn customers into repeat higher margin customers
  5. Analyze for continuous improvement

Complex inbound marketing practices target potential customers at various different levels of product/brand awareness. The most scaled tactics attempt to funnel customers from semantically related market segments, who have no product awareness or intention to purchase. This is usually achieved by taking the customer through a structured informational path, that builds awareness and increases interest over time.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up to:a b c d Leary, Brent (January 27, 2012). “Jeanne Hopkins of HubSpot: All Leads Are Not Created Equal”. Small Business Trends. Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d Basu, Dev (June 29, 2011). “Inbound marketing: The customer finds you”The Globe and Mail. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d e Prescott, Bill (February 5, 2012). “Business Sense: Inbound marketing”. Times-Standard. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  4. Jump up to:a b Benner, Michael (January 19, 2012). “Get Found: 7 Steps to Fire Up Your Inbound Marketing”. Business2Community. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  5. Jump up^ David Meerman Scott. (2010). The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use Social Media, Blogs, News Releases, Online Video, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly.(2 ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons Inc. ISBN 0-470-54781-2.
  6. Jump up^ Gilbert, Alison (February 4, 2012). “INBOUND MARKETING: How to Get Customers Without Really Trying”. Digital Brand. Retrieved February 29, 2012.
  7. Jump up to:a b Pollitt, Chad (October 21, 2011). “The New 5 Step Inbound Marketing Methodology”. Business2Community. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  8. Jump up^ Halligan, Brian; Shah, Dharmesh (2009). Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media, and Blogs. John Wiley & Sons Inc. ISBN 0-470-49931-1.
  9. Jump up^ “Disruptor of the Day: Brian Halligan, Dharmesh Shah & HubSpot – Taking The Hassle Out of Marketing”. Daily Disruption. February 8, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  10. Jump up^ “What is Inbound Marketing with Brian Whalley”. Internet Marketing Podcast. February 21, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
You’ll hear phrases like inbound marketing, digital marketing and Internet marketing used somewhat interchangeably.  What is all this newfangled stuff?  Prospects commonly take themselves through 60% or more of the sales journey (see related post titled “Prospects Take Themselves Through 60% of the Sales Journey“) and this “newfangled stuff” is what helps them find you and learn as much as needed about you.

The attached infographic from The Whole Brain Group does a nice job of explaining it all to the layman.

Check out my other blog posts related to marketing here.

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