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tumblr llcw71K5md1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Nike Billboard in NYC

Yesterday you said tomorrow

tumblr lln5jqiRBI1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Kill Bill Billboard in NYC – Bloody Mess

tumblr lln5opCDu71qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Realhiphop.com.br Outdoor Advertising

tumblr llnx22X4Vw1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Sony PSP Transparant Billboard Advertising

tumblr lm60gmbhB81qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
McDonald’s free coffee promotion.

tumblr lmdzgyOBji1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Mondo Pasta Boat Advertising

tumblr lnguymJuNy1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
The first ever plant billboard. Coca-Cola and WWF have unveiled a new 60-by-60-foot billboard in the Philippines that’s covered in Fukien tea plants, which absorb air pollution.

tumblr ln8kcvEQIL1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Allstate Insurance: Marina Tower

tumblr ln2yfzDmT41qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Powerhouse Gym Outdoor Ad

tumblr ln2xmoqdLG1qiqf01o1 500 10 very creative billboard advertisements from around the world by Jay Mug
Oltimer Restaurants – Special Poster for “Oldtimer”, a big Austrian chain for motorway rest stops

Why is Ad Blocking Suddenly so Popular? + [INFOGRAPHIC]

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Ad blocking has existed for several years now, but has been adopted by millions of Internet users in the past several months. There were only 120,000 ad blocking users in January 2010, and in the past few months, ad blocking has increased by over a million users every month, which we tracked through the Chrome and Firefox webstores. This is a much higher rate than ever before. Why is this happening? Why now?

 

Let’s try to isolate all our variables in this ad-blocking equation. We have:

 

a) the actual ads (quality and type)

Have ads changed much over the past several years? It seems to me that ads have remained constant, with some sites presenting obtrusive, loud and animated ads, while other sites present more conservative ads. With the exception of video ads, which are relatively new, the spectrum of online advertising has not changed much. So, a change in the actual ads must not be a cause of the rise in ad blocking.

b) internet users

Have the Internet users changed over the past two or three years? There are two possible ways that Internet users changed. Either they have become fed up with the same old advertising. Or, they have seen so much Internet content, that they now feel entitled to ad-free content. Most likely, both of these are causes.

c) browsers and web-stores

Many internet users are migrating to Google Chrome from Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox. Now, Chrome has over 35% of the browser market share (Source:StatCounter). Chrome has a super-effective web-store, with thousands of extensions available. More people are installing extensions now than ever before, and this inevitably leads to an increase in ad-blocking users.

d) ad-blocking technology

Has ad-blocking technology changed? AdBlock still blocks ads, as usual. But in order for AdBlock to have gained momentum, it needed to reach a critical mass. AdBlock technology is based on rules, which allowed it to become more effective as more users installed it (network effect). Only then, it provided enough value for its end-users, which then lead to a huge rise in downloads.

The result:

 

Many people seem to have a strong opinion on this subject matter; what’s yours?

Jacob

 

P.S. Check out dsero.com to recover revenue from ad-blocking users on your site! Anti-AdBlock is here.

5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

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5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

The power of online marketing on a social web has only scratched the surface of its full potential.

This year smart marketers will stop using content as a bullhorn and start using it as a platform for building engaged communities. Customers will no longer be seen simply as a source of revenue, but instead as a near endless stream of research, innovation, and sales.

This transition will mean targeted communities that are smaller and more social than the mass media audiences of the past will succeed like never before. Therefore, content will have to be focused, refined, interactive, shareable, and (most importantly) involve the audience in the creation process.

To get you ready for these important changes, here are five top tips for content marketing success:

#1. Bring the Customers Inside

Customers want businesses to solve their problems and are willing participants in that value creation process… if given the chance. Unfortunately, much of what we call “social” media marketing has hardly lived up to its name.

The key will be to move beyond the mass marketing mentality of “us vs. them.”

By empowering your customers to become part of your business processes you’ll get a great low-cost source of research & innovation.

There’s also no greater sales force in the world than a satisfied customer. And while this was once an added bonus for marketers, it’s quickly becoming a necessity. Customers increasingly vet their purchasing decisions through social networks before even considering a company’s traditional marketing.

Some things to try:

  • Ask for customer input on new projects you’re working on.
  • Allow customers to tell their own stories through co-created content (see below).
  • Create incentives (social and financial) for customers to become evangelists of your business.
  • Make sure to show that you are actually using the feedback you receive.

#2.  Focus, Focus, Focus

In the mass marketing era, half of the advertising was wasted but we just don’t know which half.

The Internet has created an ultra-segmented marketplace, which allows smart marketers to create specialized content that solves specific problems.

To be successful, your content has to be focused on a well-defined niche audience. Take the time to map out exactly who you are targeting by developing a detailed profile of your audience, including demographics, psychographics, and a thorough understanding of how they negotiate their social space.

#3. Get Organized

Most people classify content by format (blog, video, Tweet, etc.), often leading to repetitiveness and a sense by your audience that you’re shouting at them (rather than talking with them).

Why don’t you try a different framework, one that will give you a much clearer look at the role each piece of content plays in driving interaction within your community.

When you are planning out your editorial calendar, separate content into one of three categories, defined by how that piece of content was created:

  • Original content – This is material created directly by you. It should address a specific customer need – be that information, instruction, humor, motivation, etc. Use it as a way to highlight your expertise, make yourself useful, and build trust with your audience.
  • Co-created content – Created together with others. In particular, you should target influencers within the niche who can help build your authority. Examples of this are guest posts like this one, a webinar highlighting the successes of your top customers, or a podcast with someone who has expertise that complements your own.
  • Curated content – Created by others but useful in some way to your audience. This includes stuff like retweets or emailing your list with a useful report that was created by another organization.

Reframing your thinking in this way will force you to always keep in mind the business purpose behind everything you create and share.

#4. Get Emotional

In his awesome book Contagious, Wharton professor Jonah Berger showed us that one of the key reasons people share content online is because it arouses a person’s emotion.

Content has to go beyond just being useful; it has to be unforgettable. Rather than trying to churn out quantity, take the time to figure out what kind of emotions move your audience.

In doing so, it’s important to remember that not all emotion is created equal. In his research, Berger identifies that certain kinds of emotions – those that get people “aroused” like awe, passion, and anger – are much more likely to drive shares than those that make people feel toned down – like sadness, relaxation, or contentment.

Ultimately, don’t be afraid to rock the boat a bit, because what gets one person excited might turn another one away. As long as you are exciting the right people (and treating everyone well in the process), it’s ok to let some people go.

#5. Respect the Numbers but Don’t be a Machine

There are so many tools out there that allow you to use data to paint a picture of your social landscape. So many in fact that it can turn into a hindrance if you’re not careful.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s absolutely crucial to analyze and optimize, but all the data in the world won’t do you a bit of good if you don’t understand people.

And one of the most important things to understand about people is that they change. Often. Data can be an important tool for measuring these changes – it can help you test assumptions and sometimes provide a needed reality check. But it’s no replacement for digging in and becoming part of your customer community.

So, make the effort to really get to know your customers. Instead of just mass emailings and webinars, take time to have individual conversations. Understand what people are struggling with and you’ll have a near endless stream of ideas for new content to create.

The Big Picture

The world of marketing is changing, and I would argue it’s for the better. By harnessing the power of community, businesses are ending the awful competition between buyer and seller, replacing it with a much healthier process of mutual value creation.

In 2014 the kind of guesswork that has long been the way marketers figure out what their audience wants will be replaced by actually getting to know the customers themselves. By talking with them instead of at them, we can start to create a new way of doing business, one that helps bring people together to solve the problems of our day.

You now have the framework to get started. Use it to go out and build yourself a dynamic, engaged, and profitable community in 2014.

Guest author: Jake Parent has been building communities for more than a decade. His site Learn To Be Heard teaches marketers and entrepreneurs how to use blogging and other social media to transform an audience of static listeners into a dynamic group of engaged participants. 

 

 

Want to learn how to make your blog and content a success with social media marketing?

My book – “Blogging the Smart Way – How to Create and Market a Killer Blog with Social Media” – will show you how.

It is now available to download. I show you how to create and build a blog that rocks and grow tribes, fans and followers on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. It also includes dozens of tips to create contagious content that begs to be shared and tempts people to link to your website and blog.

I also reveal the tactics I used to grow my Twitter followers to over 185,000.

Download and read it now.

 

 
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Read more at http://www.jeffbullas.com/2014/01/06/5-top-tips-for-content-marketing-success/#gXrHFDd6JuY4t6Uy.99

Top Digital Marketing Trends in 2014

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Top Digital Marketing Trends in 2014

digital marketing laptop Top Digital Marketing Trends in 20142013 will be known as the year organizations began embracing different tactics for digital marketing in a big way. It will also be known as the year of the biggest social media changes:Twitter’s IPO announcement, Google andFacebook’s algorithm updates, and the list goes on. This trend of disrupting the digital marketing arena will continue into 2014 and beyond. Here is a roundup of what we predict in 2014 for the digital marketing industry:

Content continues to be king

Social Media Today reported that 78% of CMO’s believe custom content is the future of marketing. Most marketers have embraced and accepted content as a major resource in their efforts. Along with this, there has been an influx of content discovery apps which support the growth trend: Flipboard, Pulse, and Fancy (to name a few). If you’re not dedicating budget towards content development, it may be time to consider doing so!

Growth of video marketing

It goes without saying that videos have the ability to convey a message that is ten times more powerful than text content. Kony 2012 was proof that great video content has the potential of becoming an overnight viral success. Also, with apps like Instagram, Snapchat and Vine, videos are being created, viewed and shared on mobile devices. Facebook has also introduced and enhanced their mobile ads platform. Combined with the mobile potential, we predict that video marketing will grow even more in 2014.

Social media diversification

2013 has been the year of social media growth. We will continue to see this trend in the coming year. 93% of marketers already say they use social media for business, but in 2013 we also saw a surge in popularity of new networks like Pinterest, Vine and Instagram – and have become a part of everyday life. These networks are carving a unique niche for themselves, which means that businesses will continue to use different platforms to build their brands and connect with consumers.

Why Traffic Is Digital Marketing’s Foundational Metric

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English: Creating lifelong customer value with...

English: Creating lifelong customer value with your affiliate marketing business. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Business Card (png file)

Business Card (png file) (Photo credit: docpop)

What's in the bag? Business of Software 2010

What’s in the bag? Business of Software 2010 (Photo credit: betsyweber)

English: A business ideally is continually see...

English: A business ideally is continually seeking feedback from customers: are the products helpful? are their needs being met? Constructive criticism helps marketers make adjustments to their products and services to adapt to the changing needs of their customers. Source of diagram: here (see public domain declaration at top). Questions: write me at my Wikipedia talk page or email me at thomaswrightsulcer@yahoo.com (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Marketing Digital

Marketing Digital (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Marketing Metrics Continuum provides a fra...

The Marketing Metrics Continuum provides a framework for how to categorize metrics from the tactical to strategic. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A business ideally is continually see...

English: A business ideally is continually seeking feedback from customers: are the products helpful? are their needs being met? Constructive criticism helps marketers adjust offerings to meet customer needs. Source of diagram: here (see public domain declaration at top). Questions: write me at my Wikipedia talk page (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Why Traffic Is Digital Marketing’s Foundational Metric

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BY DANI FANKHAUSER10 HOURS AGO
If you take the retail marketing adage “location, location, location,” and translate it to digital, the result would be visit rate, or traffic. In the physical world, it’s possible to pay premium rent to get your product in front of lots of people, but on the web, garnering traffic is a bit more nuanced. The medium requires strategies that are focused on targeted audiences rather than the general public, not because products are narrow, but because methods of measuring efficacy enable marketers to see more success this way.

Visit rate is likely the oldest metric on the Internet, and continues to be highly relevant for every kind of businesses. The most widely used statistic is visits per day, although unique visitors per day is usually seen as more actionable. This rate is often compared month-to-month or year-over-year and is often paired with frequency of visits, return visits or daily return visits.

“Visit rate is always the ‘basic’ indicator for everything,” says Susan McPherson, SVP of CSR at Fenton. “It sets the stage for the deeper, more substantive engagement that is required.”

Because visit rate is a basic temperature-taker for your business’ web presence, you need to keep track of visit rate to determine what’s working and what’s not. Tying traffic spikes and dips to specific events (perhaps a mention on a local TV show, a flash sale or a social media faux pas) help gauge interest in your brand, and can influence your future marketing efforts.

The methods for logging traffic will vary based on your type of business and how you generate revenue, but we’ve outlined some basic strategies below.

The Data Points to Count

Daily and monthly traffic, counted as unique visitors or total visits, is easily accessible in any analytics software. From there, you can dig deeper by looking at audiencesources and entrance and exit pages.

If your product can only be shipped to certain regions, it’s helpful to ensure that your traffic is indeed coming from that area — if significant traffic comes from elsewhere, you might consider making business changes. Your sources of traffic will indicate what social channels, search terms or other referrals to optimize. Entrance and exit pages can help you determine if the layout of your website is doing its job — are people having to navigate to many pages before they find what they’re looking for? Are they bouncing at a high rate? You may want to add additional paths to a certain page on your site if it proves to be popular (or is especially timely, like a holiday special).

While traffic is an important base metric, it must be built upon — organic traffic alone can’t sustain your business. You need conversion, too.

“Visit rate is one of the primary indicators that a brand is reaching users online,” Jason Squardo, executive vice president of optimization at ZOG Digital, “but it is incorrect to assume it will automatically lead to increased leads and sales.”

Bucketing traffic by source, demographic and more can help you pinpoint what portion of your traffic is indeed providing value so you can optimize these channels and drive even more value.

What Traffic Means for Different Kinds of Businesses

How you view traffic depends on your business. Media businesses are a prime example of all traffic being equal — traffic, more or less, equals dollars. Each page view is essentially a piece of inventory.

For an ecommerce business, traffic is critical for different reasons — more traffic means a greater potential for conversion.

“This is the equivalent to the old retail adage ‘location, location, location’; the more people you have in the store, the more sales you can have,” says Jon Gibs, VP of analytics at Huge.

But visits to an ecommerce site that do not result in a purchase aren’t to be ignored completely. Perhaps the consumer came to check your hours, find a location or compare prices. If they had a good experience, they might come back to buy at some point in the future (or maybe they bought in your brick-and-mortar store).

If you’re looking to drive return traffic, content marketing is one tactic. “Engaging, fresh and compelling content posted on a regular basis” is essential for driving return visits and developing brand ambassadors, says marketer Rob Longert. The more this content adds value, the more users will come to your site to consume … and they just might convert while they’re there.

Turning Traffic Into Business

Whatever traffic-related data is most relevant to your business is the traffic to optimize — and most businesses will pick one type of traffic to focus on. It might be referrals from Facebook, or traffic to a “How It Works” page that indicates serious user interest.

“Visits to a website are great, but not all are created equal.

“Visits to a website are great, but not all are created equal. It’s important to target those who are more likely to buy,” says Squardo, explaining that a marketer’s goal is to correlate a traffic metric with conversions.

For a media business and an ecommerce business alike, the cost of acquisition will be higher than the cost of bringing back repeat visitors, since there’s no previously demonstrated interest in the company.

“Levels of return visitation can be more important than the actual number of raw visitors,” says Gibs. “If you assume there is a cost to acquire any given customer, having a high level of return visitation allows you to amortize your acquisition cost across multiple visits, or more specifically, the revenue that any given user drives.”

Image: Mashable composite. iStock, mathisworksartshock