Top Digital Marketing Trends in 2014

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Top Digital Marketing Trends in 2014

digital marketing laptop Top Digital Marketing Trends in 20142013 will be known as the year organizations began embracing different tactics for digital marketing in a big way. It will also be known as the year of the biggest social media changes:Twitter’s IPO announcement, Google andFacebook’s algorithm updates, and the list goes on. This trend of disrupting the digital marketing arena will continue into 2014 and beyond. Here is a roundup of what we predict in 2014 for the digital marketing industry:

Content continues to be king

Social Media Today reported that 78% of CMO’s believe custom content is the future of marketing. Most marketers have embraced and accepted content as a major resource in their efforts. Along with this, there has been an influx of content discovery apps which support the growth trend: Flipboard, Pulse, and Fancy (to name a few). If you’re not dedicating budget towards content development, it may be time to consider doing so!

Growth of video marketing

It goes without saying that videos have the ability to convey a message that is ten times more powerful than text content. Kony 2012 was proof that great video content has the potential of becoming an overnight viral success. Also, with apps like Instagram, Snapchat and Vine, videos are being created, viewed and shared on mobile devices. Facebook has also introduced and enhanced their mobile ads platform. Combined with the mobile potential, we predict that video marketing will grow even more in 2014.

Social media diversification

2013 has been the year of social media growth. We will continue to see this trend in the coming year. 93% of marketers already say they use social media for business, but in 2013 we also saw a surge in popularity of new networks like Pinterest, Vine and Instagram – and have become a part of everyday life. These networks are carving a unique niche for themselves, which means that businesses will continue to use different platforms to build their brands and connect with consumers.

3 REASONS TRADITIONAL MARKET RESEARCH IS BECOMING IRRELEVANT

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Research being carried out at the Microscopy l...

Research being carried out at the Microscopy lab of the . This photo was taken on July 28, 2006 using a Nikon D70. For more information about INL’s research projects and career opportunities, visit the lab’s facebook site. http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Marketing research interviews and focus groups

Marketing research interviews and focus groups (Photo credit: dmhoro)

focus group dialogue

focus group dialogue (Photo credit: bijoubaby)

English: Mobile marketing research - Methods

English: Mobile marketing research – Methods (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Two examples of the T39m, on the left...

English: Two examples of the T39m, on the left is the Classic Blue colour and on the right is the Icecap Blue (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Data from April 2011 Editor Survey th...

English: Data from April 2011 Editor Survey that lists Social Media activities (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A protester holding a placard in Tahr...

English: A protester holding a placard in Tahrir Square referring to Facebook and Twitter, acknowledging the role played by social media during the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On any given day, how many people do you see walking by with a flip phone? A discman? We’ll venture a guess that you’re probably not seeing very many. Technologies have advanced, replacing these once innovative devices with a more efficient, multi-function tool. 

The same can be said about the world of consumer data and its applications in understanding brand health.

Traditionally, companies used focus groups and surveys as their primary research methods. Such practices provided insights into the preferences and behaviors of a brand’s target demographic. That being said, they also presented significant limitations:

  • Bias: Given the small size of focus groups and the regimented manner in which  they are run, participants are often influenced by other participants and  moderators.
  • Unreliable Results: Audience samples are rarely an accurate representation of the larger  target audience.
  • High Costs: Crafting questions, gathering a representative sample, conducting  surveys, and analyzing results… it takes a lot of time and money to  regularly and effectively execute such studies.

Over the past decade, avenues have opened up for more efficient forms of research. Socialmedia technologies have completely changed the way in which consumers perceive, engage, and consume brands. Postcards requesting customer feedback have been replaced with unsolicited endorsements shared on Facebook brand pages. Angry calls to customer service have been replaced with scorching (and public) 140 character tweets. Consumer feedback is now available in real-time at a massive scale, so why would we continue to limit ourselves to surveys and focus groups? It makes sense to harness the power of consumer social media activity to better understand brands.