Why is Ad Blocking Suddenly so Popular? + [INFOGRAPHIC]

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Ad blocking has existed for several years now, but has been adopted by millions of Internet users in the past several months. There were only 120,000 ad blocking users in January 2010, and in the past few months, ad blocking has increased by over a million users every month, which we tracked through the Chrome and Firefox webstores. This is a much higher rate than ever before. Why is this happening? Why now?

 

Let’s try to isolate all our variables in this ad-blocking equation. We have:

 

a) the actual ads (quality and type)

Have ads changed much over the past several years? It seems to me that ads have remained constant, with some sites presenting obtrusive, loud and animated ads, while other sites present more conservative ads. With the exception of video ads, which are relatively new, the spectrum of online advertising has not changed much. So, a change in the actual ads must not be a cause of the rise in ad blocking.

b) internet users

Have the Internet users changed over the past two or three years? There are two possible ways that Internet users changed. Either they have become fed up with the same old advertising. Or, they have seen so much Internet content, that they now feel entitled to ad-free content. Most likely, both of these are causes.

c) browsers and web-stores

Many internet users are migrating to Google Chrome from Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox. Now, Chrome has over 35% of the browser market share (Source:StatCounter). Chrome has a super-effective web-store, with thousands of extensions available. More people are installing extensions now than ever before, and this inevitably leads to an increase in ad-blocking users.

d) ad-blocking technology

Has ad-blocking technology changed? AdBlock still blocks ads, as usual. But in order for AdBlock to have gained momentum, it needed to reach a critical mass. AdBlock technology is based on rules, which allowed it to become more effective as more users installed it (network effect). Only then, it provided enough value for its end-users, which then lead to a huge rise in downloads.

The result:

 

Many people seem to have a strong opinion on this subject matter; what’s yours?

Jacob

 

P.S. Check out dsero.com to recover revenue from ad-blocking users on your site! Anti-AdBlock is here.

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28 Factors to Determine the Maturity of Your Inbound Marketing

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English: A business ideally is continually see...

English: A business ideally is continually seeking feedback from customers: are the products helpful? are their needs being met? Constructive criticism helps marketers adjust offerings to meet customer needs. Source of diagram: here (see public domain declaration at top). Questions: write me at my Wikipedia talk page (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Diversification (marketing strategy)

Diversification (marketing strategy) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

28 Factors to Determine the Maturity of Your Inbound Marketing image ID 100171705 resized 600What if there were a maturity model for inbound marketers?

Seriously, I can’t be the only nerd that’s ever wondered this before.

The unofficial intro to maturity models is that they’re what happens when a whole bunch of really smart people get together and use dozens of years of academic experience and professional context to trend what often happens. More officially, accrediting body APMG writes that they’re used for organizations to assess their “methods and processes…according to a clear set of external benchmarks.”

When correctly compiled, these models contain helpful factors like questionnaires and benchmarks. They’re certified and verified by third parties. This blog post isn’t everything you need to determine the maturity of your inbound marketing strategy, but it’s a start. We’ve categorized some criteria that could define a company at each stage:

1. Immature Inbound Marketing

Blogging doesn’t mean your brand’s nailed the ins and outs of inbound marketing, even if you’re doing it on a regular basis. Neither does social media, maintaining an editorial calendar, or any other inbound marketing basics. There’s no shame in having a less mature inbound marketing program, but it is dangerous to close yourself off to concepts of improvement. Signs of a less mature inbound program could include:

  1. Occasional or Intermittent Collaboration Between Silos (Social, Content, and Email)

  2. Basic Lead Nurturing Segments

  3. Fewer than 10 Landing Pages and Content Offers

  4. Undefined and documented strategy

  5. Lack of advanced planning

  6. Inconsistent or Infrequent Metrics Analysis

2. Intermediate Inbound Marketing

Your business could probably do fine if you stagnate at an intermediate level of maturity, and let’s be totally honest – many companies have. In many cases, maturity models are shaped a lot like funnels, but it anecdotally seems that the inbound world’s got a pretty chunky middle. Signs of this stage often include (but aren’t limited to):

  1. Between 10-15 Landing Pages and Content Offers

  2. Documented strategy that’s typically up-to-date

  3. Multiple research-based buyer personas

  4. Lead Nurturing Workflows for Each Content Offer

  5. Inclusion of Visual Content and Targeted Content Curation

  6. Keyword Research and SEO Optimization

  7. Guest Blogging Outreach and Link-Building Strategies

  8. A/B Testing of Landing Pages, CTAs and Emails

3. Advanced Inbound Marketing

There’s really not too many examples of brands who’ve got the inbound marketing thing down so well that it’s hard to find anything wrong with their strategy. ModCloth’s definitely in this category, and so is HubSpot (of course)Betabrand and  AppSumo, are solidly mature, too. If you’re in this latter class, we’d love to hear from you, and about the changes you made to get your program up to par. Signs that you’re passing with flying colors might include the following:

  1. Responsive or mobile-optimized design

  2. Obsessive detail to user experience

  3. Use of 12 or more content marketing tactics

  4. Advanced lead nurturing tactics (accelerated and lost lead campaigns, among others)

  5. Interview-based buyer personas

  6. Ongoing SEO Optimization

  7. More than 15-20 landing pages and content offers

  8. Campaign-themed content and social media marketing

  9. Advanced efficiency measures, including content retargeting and repurposing

  10. Thought leadership among employees, including Google Authorship and Regular Columns

  11. Use of Smart (or Dynamic) Content

  12. Progressive Profiling

  13. Net Promoter Score Surveying

  14. Lead Scoring

Did I mention that the factors above are by no means an official inbound marketing maturity model? That being said, I think every business can benefit from ongoing and thorough evaluation of whether they’re taking full advantage of their marketing tools, and areas in which they could improve. It’s rare to find an organization which fits perfectly into a single stage of even official maturity models, and the inbound world is no exception – maybe your organization’s totally nailed persona-driven content marketing, but struggling with the lead nurturing side of things.

I welcome feedback on these thoughts, and would love to get input on other techniques and tactics organizations tend to adopt as they move toward a more mature inbound strategy.

What do you think are signs of an advanced and well-supported digital marketing program?

28 Factors to Determine the Maturity of Your Inbound Marketing image 29c14190 469d 4d36 8900 3dffef631d2e5

image credit: stockimages/freedigitalphotos.net 28 Factors to Determine the Maturity of Your Inbound Marketing image

Author:Jasmine Henry     Jasmine Henry on the Web Jasmine Henry on Facebook Jasmine Henry on Twitter Jasmine Henry RSS Feed

Jasmine is Content Manager at Inbound Marketing Agents, an innovative Hubspot partner offering full-agency services based in Nashville, TN. She writes about social media, business blogging, crowdsourcing and millennials…. View full profile

This article originally appeared on Inbound Marketing Blog and has been republished with permission.

Find out how to syndicate your content with Business 2 Community.

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Inbound marketing From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Components of Inbound Marketing

Components of Inbound Marketing (Photo credit: Gavin Llewellyn)

Data Matrix, encoding the text: Wikipedia, the...

Data Matrix, encoding the text: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: MaxiCode encoding of the text "W...

English: MaxiCode encoding of the text “Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”. Intended to replace :Image:UPS_MaxiCode_example.png (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Inbound marketing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the synonymous term coined by Seth Godin, see Permission marketing. For the product management sense of Inbound Marketing, see Product management.

Inbound marketing is advertising a company through blogspodcastsvideoeBooksenewsletterswhitepapersSEOsocial media marketing, and other forms of content marketing which serve to bring customers in closer to the brand, where they want to be.[1][2][3] In contrast, buying attention,[1] cold-calling, direct paper mailradio, TV advertisements,[2] sales flyers, spamtelemarketing[3] and traditional advertising[4] are considered “outbound marketing”. Inbound marketing earns the attention of customers,[1] makes the company easy to be found[2] and draws customers to the website[4] by producing interesting content.[3]

David Meerman Scott recommends that marketers “earn their way in” (via publishing helpful information on a blog etc.) in contrast to outbound marketing where they “buy, beg, or bug their way in” (via paid advertisements, issuing press releases, or paying commissioned sales people, respectively).[5] The term is synonymous with the concept of permission marketing, which is the title of a book by Seth Godin.[3] The inbound marketing term was coined by HubSpot’s Brian Halligan,[2][3][6] in 2005.[7][8] According to HubSpot, inbound marketing is especially effective for small businesses[9] that deal with high dollar values, long research cycles and knowledge-based products. In these areas prospects are more likely to get informed and hire someone who demonstrates expertise.[10]

In one case inbound marketing was defined by three phases: Get found, Convert and Analyze.[1] A newer model from Business2Community illustrates the concept in five stages:[7]

  1. Attract traffic
  2. Convert visitors to leads
  3. Convert leads to sales
  4. Turn customers into repeat higher margin customers
  5. Analyze for continuous improvement

Complex inbound marketing practices target potential customers at various different levels of product/brand awareness. The most scaled tactics attempt to funnel customers from semantically related market segments, who have no product awareness or intention to purchase. This is usually achieved by taking the customer through a structured informational path, that builds awareness and increases interest over time.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up to:a b c d Leary, Brent (January 27, 2012). “Jeanne Hopkins of HubSpot: All Leads Are Not Created Equal”. Small Business Trends. Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d Basu, Dev (June 29, 2011). “Inbound marketing: The customer finds you”The Globe and Mail. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d e Prescott, Bill (February 5, 2012). “Business Sense: Inbound marketing”. Times-Standard. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  4. Jump up to:a b Benner, Michael (January 19, 2012). “Get Found: 7 Steps to Fire Up Your Inbound Marketing”. Business2Community. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  5. Jump up^ David Meerman Scott. (2010). The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use Social Media, Blogs, News Releases, Online Video, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly.(2 ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons Inc. ISBN 0-470-54781-2.
  6. Jump up^ Gilbert, Alison (February 4, 2012). “INBOUND MARKETING: How to Get Customers Without Really Trying”. Digital Brand. Retrieved February 29, 2012.
  7. Jump up to:a b Pollitt, Chad (October 21, 2011). “The New 5 Step Inbound Marketing Methodology”. Business2Community. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  8. Jump up^ Halligan, Brian; Shah, Dharmesh (2009). Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media, and Blogs. John Wiley & Sons Inc. ISBN 0-470-49931-1.
  9. Jump up^ “Disruptor of the Day: Brian Halligan, Dharmesh Shah & HubSpot – Taking The Hassle Out of Marketing”. Daily Disruption. February 8, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  10. Jump up^ “What is Inbound Marketing with Brian Whalley”. Internet Marketing Podcast. February 21, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
You’ll hear phrases like inbound marketing, digital marketing and Internet marketing used somewhat interchangeably.  What is all this newfangled stuff?  Prospects commonly take themselves through 60% or more of the sales journey (see related post titled “Prospects Take Themselves Through 60% of the Sales Journey“) and this “newfangled stuff” is what helps them find you and learn as much as needed about you.

The attached infographic from The Whole Brain Group does a nice job of explaining it all to the layman.

Check out my other blog posts related to marketing here.

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The Marketing Metrics Continuum provides a fra...

The Marketing Metrics Continuum provides a framework for how to categorize metrics from the tactical to strategic. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A business ideally is continually see...

English: A business ideally is continually seeking feedback from customers: are the products helpful? are their needs being met? Constructive criticism helps marketers adjust offerings to meet customer needs. Source of diagram: here (see public domain declaration at top). Questions: write me at my Wikipedia talk page (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

[Fish market, Bergen, Norway] (LOC)

[Fish market, Bergen, Norway] (LOC) (Photo credit: The Library of Congress)

Português do Brasil: Matriz GE / McKinsey

Português do Brasil: Matriz GE / McKinsey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

market 1

market 1 (Photo credit: tim caynes)

Image representing REPLY as depicted in CrunchBase

Image by None via CrunchBase

An overview of online marketing. A simple grap...

An overview of online marketing. A simple graph that represents the major components of online marketing, including, Search Engine Marketing (SEM), Search Engine Optimization (SEO), including RSS and Atom feeds, Affiliate Marketing, Email Marketing, Viral Networking/Blogs and Social Netowrking. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)