Social Media Marketing, Twitter Marketing

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11 Essential Rules for Powerful Twitter Marketing

Twitter is changing. The cute bird has gone public, introduced self service advertising and is verging on visual.

I remember when I joined in 2008, that the rules of engagement were just about fun and frivolity. It was a playground for social media enthusiasts that were exploring and pushing the boundaries. It was about having conversations with people all over the world. That still happens.

There were only 4 million people on the platform when I began and using it for marketing was not considered. We were all just playing. Today with mass media embracing it for TV, real time breaking news, distributing content and viral marketing the bird has muscled up.

With its increased maturity the rules have become clearer and its marketing power obvious. Here are some essential rules for Powerful twitter marketing to increase brand awareness, leads and sales.

#1. Perfect the Twitter profile

This one is often underestimated. When people check out your Twitter account and profile they will only give you a few seconds when checking out your profile. They must know at a glance what your brand is about whether that is a corporate or personal brand. Here are a couple of examples.

Content Marketing Institute is all about content and events. Their profile makes that obvious.

10 Rules You Must Follow for Powerful Twitter Marketing A personal brand will need to display not only what they do but provide some social proof. Here my good friend Mark Schaefer tells you what he does and adds the “credibility factor” of a successful author.

10 Rules You Must Follow for Powerful Twitter Marketing

Now there is no “perfect Twitter profile but make sure that it is sending the right message quickly. It can even be your brand elevator pitch!

#2. Link to your online platform

Social media (and Twitter) is not an island and ensuring that your social networks and blogs are interlinked is key. Many people will check out your blog or website before following. They will be checking out your online credibility.

So make sure you have that link.

#3. Create tempting Twitter headlines

Just check your Twitter stream and your will see “the good the bad and the ugly “when it comes to headlines. Just take a moment to see which Twitter headlines you want to click on.

What do you see?

So think about your Twitter headline before tweeting because it will make a difference. Studies have shown that you can increase your conversion rate on a link by 73% if you use a compelling headline.

#4.Use visual tweets

Visual tweets were not even imagined when Twitter started. But the introduction of tweets that display in the stream without having to click have some distinct advantages.

These include the following increases in activity according to some initial research from Buffer:

  • Tweets with images received 89% more favourites
  • Tweets with images received 18% more clicks than those without
  • Tweets with images received 150% more retweets

Now that doesn’t mean that every tweet should be visual but work out ways to incorporate that into  your tweeting habits.

Twitter pic at my desk while early morning writing

#5. Tweet with hash tags

The hash tag was an idea that was invented for Twitter. It started in 2007 by Chris Messina to tag topics of interest on the microblogging network. He posted the alleged first post on Twitter to include what would become the “hashtag”:

How do you feel about using # (pound) for groups. As in #barcamp? ”

The first high profile use of the hashtag was in the 2007 California fires by Nate Ritter with #sandiegofire.

The use of the # hashtag has now spread to the other social networks including Google+, Instagram, Pinterest and even Facebook. It allows you to both find and see tweets that are relevant to a topic and group them in one place. Here is how it can be used viewed on the tool Hootsuite for seeing tweets about #contentmarketing.

Hashtags content marketingHashtags are a powerful way to direct your tweets to people looking for that topic. It is more an art than a science and can be likened to “Herding Cats“.

#6. Automate the tweets

Automation was and is sometimes seen as a threat to the free world by social media purists. They view social networks as only to be used for conversations and not marketing. The truth is that you cannot do “social at scale” for marketing if you don’t use some form of automation. A couple of tools for bloggers that I have found essential is Twitterfeed and also a low cost monthly subscription platform Socialoomph – Professional Edition.

For corporate social media marketing you will need to consider using platforms from Hubspot and Marketo for small to medium businesses up to Enterprise level software such as Sprinklr and Adobe if you are a larger corporation.

The principle I have found to work for me is “automate the content distribution but not the conversation” This will keep you real but also efficient.

#7. Grow your Twitter tribe

Continuing to work at building your Twitter followers. One of the keys to this is using the principle of reciprocation. Actively follow people and they will feel a certain obligation to follow you back. The success of this is then linked to a few factors such as having a link to your website or blog which should display great content , exhibits credibility and shows social proof. If you look substantial and popular then people are more likely to follow back

Just like email you will have the equivalent of “un-subscribe” it’s called “un-follow”. It happens all the time, so if you lose a few followers here and there, don’t break into tears. Just continue to focus producing the best content you can for your followers.

#8. Target “your” audience

Now, I made a lot of mistakes along the way and one of them was following anyone who had a Twitter heartbeat. During my social media adolescence I followed large Twitter users who had nothing to do with my target market or topic.

Using the Twitter tool Tweepi.com (paid version) I can follow followers of other bloggers in my niche(s). For me that includes blogging, social media, digital and content marketing, These are qualified groups of followers. The principle of reciprocation does the rest. Some follow you back!

#9. @Mention others

The tactic of using @mentions when tweeting their content means they will notice you in their stream. Here are some I can notice right now! I share about 25 bloggers content on a consistent basis and the @mention is always used when sharing their valuable content.

How to get noticed on Twitter

This can lead to being able to connect and network. It is also an affirmation that you appreciate the content.

#10.Engage

Engagement is a term that is often overused, often to its detriment on social media. What it really means is that you thank people (when you can), share their content, have conversations and in general just have some personable fun. It will surprise you to where it will lead.

Even friendships on the other side of the world.

I remember one with Amy Howell that emerged from a very funny online and sometimes bizarre conversation that we had on Twitter 4 years ago. She ended up introducing me as a Keynote speaker with that story when I spoke in Knoxville in the USA last year.

One challenge you will find as you grow your follower network into the thousands is keeping up the personal engagement. I am still working on that.

#11. Persist

Organic Twitter marketing success doesn’t happen overnight. Sure you can pay for Twitter advertising to accelerate the process. But the seduction of earning your follower base rather than pulling out the credit card  is one of the attractions of social media for me.

So persist with growing your followers, engaging with others and distributing their and your content on a consistent basis and the results will show up!

Read more at http://www.jeffbullas.com/2014/01/24/11-essential-rules-for-powerful-twitter-marketing/#K1EBCviktqXStcOy.99

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5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

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5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

5 Top Tips for Content Marketing Success

The power of online marketing on a social web has only scratched the surface of its full potential.

This year smart marketers will stop using content as a bullhorn and start using it as a platform for building engaged communities. Customers will no longer be seen simply as a source of revenue, but instead as a near endless stream of research, innovation, and sales.

This transition will mean targeted communities that are smaller and more social than the mass media audiences of the past will succeed like never before. Therefore, content will have to be focused, refined, interactive, shareable, and (most importantly) involve the audience in the creation process.

To get you ready for these important changes, here are five top tips for content marketing success:

#1. Bring the Customers Inside

Customers want businesses to solve their problems and are willing participants in that value creation process… if given the chance. Unfortunately, much of what we call “social” media marketing has hardly lived up to its name.

The key will be to move beyond the mass marketing mentality of “us vs. them.”

By empowering your customers to become part of your business processes you’ll get a great low-cost source of research & innovation.

There’s also no greater sales force in the world than a satisfied customer. And while this was once an added bonus for marketers, it’s quickly becoming a necessity. Customers increasingly vet their purchasing decisions through social networks before even considering a company’s traditional marketing.

Some things to try:

  • Ask for customer input on new projects you’re working on.
  • Allow customers to tell their own stories through co-created content (see below).
  • Create incentives (social and financial) for customers to become evangelists of your business.
  • Make sure to show that you are actually using the feedback you receive.

#2.  Focus, Focus, Focus

In the mass marketing era, half of the advertising was wasted but we just don’t know which half.

The Internet has created an ultra-segmented marketplace, which allows smart marketers to create specialized content that solves specific problems.

To be successful, your content has to be focused on a well-defined niche audience. Take the time to map out exactly who you are targeting by developing a detailed profile of your audience, including demographics, psychographics, and a thorough understanding of how they negotiate their social space.

#3. Get Organized

Most people classify content by format (blog, video, Tweet, etc.), often leading to repetitiveness and a sense by your audience that you’re shouting at them (rather than talking with them).

Why don’t you try a different framework, one that will give you a much clearer look at the role each piece of content plays in driving interaction within your community.

When you are planning out your editorial calendar, separate content into one of three categories, defined by how that piece of content was created:

  • Original content – This is material created directly by you. It should address a specific customer need – be that information, instruction, humor, motivation, etc. Use it as a way to highlight your expertise, make yourself useful, and build trust with your audience.
  • Co-created content – Created together with others. In particular, you should target influencers within the niche who can help build your authority. Examples of this are guest posts like this one, a webinar highlighting the successes of your top customers, or a podcast with someone who has expertise that complements your own.
  • Curated content – Created by others but useful in some way to your audience. This includes stuff like retweets or emailing your list with a useful report that was created by another organization.

Reframing your thinking in this way will force you to always keep in mind the business purpose behind everything you create and share.

#4. Get Emotional

In his awesome book Contagious, Wharton professor Jonah Berger showed us that one of the key reasons people share content online is because it arouses a person’s emotion.

Content has to go beyond just being useful; it has to be unforgettable. Rather than trying to churn out quantity, take the time to figure out what kind of emotions move your audience.

In doing so, it’s important to remember that not all emotion is created equal. In his research, Berger identifies that certain kinds of emotions – those that get people “aroused” like awe, passion, and anger – are much more likely to drive shares than those that make people feel toned down – like sadness, relaxation, or contentment.

Ultimately, don’t be afraid to rock the boat a bit, because what gets one person excited might turn another one away. As long as you are exciting the right people (and treating everyone well in the process), it’s ok to let some people go.

#5. Respect the Numbers but Don’t be a Machine

There are so many tools out there that allow you to use data to paint a picture of your social landscape. So many in fact that it can turn into a hindrance if you’re not careful.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s absolutely crucial to analyze and optimize, but all the data in the world won’t do you a bit of good if you don’t understand people.

And one of the most important things to understand about people is that they change. Often. Data can be an important tool for measuring these changes – it can help you test assumptions and sometimes provide a needed reality check. But it’s no replacement for digging in and becoming part of your customer community.

So, make the effort to really get to know your customers. Instead of just mass emailings and webinars, take time to have individual conversations. Understand what people are struggling with and you’ll have a near endless stream of ideas for new content to create.

The Big Picture

The world of marketing is changing, and I would argue it’s for the better. By harnessing the power of community, businesses are ending the awful competition between buyer and seller, replacing it with a much healthier process of mutual value creation.

In 2014 the kind of guesswork that has long been the way marketers figure out what their audience wants will be replaced by actually getting to know the customers themselves. By talking with them instead of at them, we can start to create a new way of doing business, one that helps bring people together to solve the problems of our day.

You now have the framework to get started. Use it to go out and build yourself a dynamic, engaged, and profitable community in 2014.

Guest author: Jake Parent has been building communities for more than a decade. His site Learn To Be Heard teaches marketers and entrepreneurs how to use blogging and other social media to transform an audience of static listeners into a dynamic group of engaged participants. 

 

 

Want to learn how to make your blog and content a success with social media marketing?

My book – “Blogging the Smart Way – How to Create and Market a Killer Blog with Social Media” – will show you how.

It is now available to download. I show you how to create and build a blog that rocks and grow tribes, fans and followers on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. It also includes dozens of tips to create contagious content that begs to be shared and tempts people to link to your website and blog.

I also reveal the tactics I used to grow my Twitter followers to over 185,000.

Download and read it now.

 

 
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Read more at http://www.jeffbullas.com/2014/01/06/5-top-tips-for-content-marketing-success/#gXrHFDd6JuY4t6Uy.99

Top Digital Marketing Trends in 2014

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Top Digital Marketing Trends in 2014

digital marketing laptop Top Digital Marketing Trends in 20142013 will be known as the year organizations began embracing different tactics for digital marketing in a big way. It will also be known as the year of the biggest social media changes:Twitter’s IPO announcement, Google andFacebook’s algorithm updates, and the list goes on. This trend of disrupting the digital marketing arena will continue into 2014 and beyond. Here is a roundup of what we predict in 2014 for the digital marketing industry:

Content continues to be king

Social Media Today reported that 78% of CMO’s believe custom content is the future of marketing. Most marketers have embraced and accepted content as a major resource in their efforts. Along with this, there has been an influx of content discovery apps which support the growth trend: Flipboard, Pulse, and Fancy (to name a few). If you’re not dedicating budget towards content development, it may be time to consider doing so!

Growth of video marketing

It goes without saying that videos have the ability to convey a message that is ten times more powerful than text content. Kony 2012 was proof that great video content has the potential of becoming an overnight viral success. Also, with apps like Instagram, Snapchat and Vine, videos are being created, viewed and shared on mobile devices. Facebook has also introduced and enhanced their mobile ads platform. Combined with the mobile potential, we predict that video marketing will grow even more in 2014.

Social media diversification

2013 has been the year of social media growth. We will continue to see this trend in the coming year. 93% of marketers already say they use social media for business, but in 2013 we also saw a surge in popularity of new networks like Pinterest, Vine and Instagram – and have become a part of everyday life. These networks are carving a unique niche for themselves, which means that businesses will continue to use different platforms to build their brands and connect with consumers.

50 Attributes of a Great Copywriter

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50 Attributes of a Great Copywriter

 

50 Attributes of a Great Copywriter

Suppose you’re in the market to hire a great copywriter. Suppose you’re in the market to become a great copywriter.  What are the attributes of success? After spending many decades writing, editing and hiring/managing writers, here are 50 attributes of a great copywriter that stand out to me.

What can you add to the list?

1. Curiosity. Writers are like six–year-olds; they always want to know why. Curiosity is the gateway to clarity. As Einstein said, “If you can’t explain it to a six-year-old, you don’t understand it yourself.“

2. Clarity. The difference between a writer and someone who writes is that the former enlightens the reader while the latter confuses the reader.

3. Passion. Further down, I’m putting words like “boring” and “trivial” in quotations because to great copywriters, nothing is boring or trivial if that’s what they’re writing about.

4. Vocabulary. More than just knowing a lot of words, writers must know the nuances of meaning that distinguish, say, notorious from famous.

5. Precision … The devil is in the details of grammar, punctuation and style. From sloppy copywriting, readers infer a sloppy author (i.e., your company).

6. … Without perfectionism. If a writer never says, “Done!” nothing ever gets published.

7.  Diligence. Professionals are expected to work efficiently and meet deadlines. This applies to copywriters and other creative talent.

8.  Ability to multitask. How nice it would be if copywriters could handle one assignment at a time. Unfortunately, in the real world they have to juggle jobs just like everyone else.

9. Focus. To multitask effectively, copywriters need the ability to stay in the moment, focusing entirely on the job at hand. Distractibility diminishes quality.

10. Self-motivation. The manager who motivates a writer to write by screaming, “WRITE!” has yet to be born.

11. Self-editing. Arrogance undermines quality. Great copywriters know when their own ideas stink and treat them accordingly.

12. Versatility of form. Business writing is so much more than articles and web pages; I once described 18 types of odd copywriting jobs. The more of these assignments a writer can handle, the more valuable he or she is to any business or agency or client.

13. Versatility of voice. Some writers master the conversational style; others master the technical or formal (boardroom) style. Those who can move gracefully from one style to another are rare treasures indeed.

14. Versatility of purpose. Some writers are uncomfortable with the concept of a hard sales pitch; other writers are uncomfortable with “boring” assignments. Great writers are uncomfortable with not writing.

15. Consistency of quality. Great copywriters consistently turn in work of high quality, rather than just being great when they feel like it or by chance.

16. Is quick on the uptake. Because of deadlines, copywriters often have to learn on the job and on their own – and quickly.

17. Knows when to stop learning. Being quick on the uptake also means knowing when you know enough to get the job done. Writers who feel the need to know everything before hitting the keyboard never get started.

18. Knows when to ask for help. A writer has two choices: struggle endlessly with a vexing problem or get help from a subject matter expert. The latter option improves speed and accuracy.

19. Knows whom to ask for help. A writer is only as good as the brain trust that surrounds him or her. Choose collaborators wisely. There may be no such thing as a foolish question, but without a doubt, there is such a thing as a foolish answer.

20. Handles criticism professionally. Clients, internal personnel and editors always criticize draft copy. If these people feel they must walk on eggshells when dealing with the writer about edits, morale and productivity suffer mightily.

21. Defends the work. Great writers not only accept and even welcome constructive criticism, they also turn the tables and make a persuasive case for their work. Clients, managers and editors are not always right; an overly compliant writer contributes to mediocre content.

22. Has perspective. On the other hand, great writers don’t make mountains out of molehills. Writers who continually get hung up on small matters of style or approach infuriate coworkers and bosses. 

23. Knows the rules. When it comes to punctuation, grammar and style, writers can’t make it up as they go along. Because both correctness and consistency are important, good writers are familiar with the rules (e.g., AP style) that govern their type of writing.

24. Knows when to violate the rules. Selectively breaking rules is a sophisticated technique for capturing attention. Apple’s “Think Different” campaign succeeded in part by departing from the boring and pedestrian phrase, think differently

25. Uses plain English. Knowing a lot of words is good, but using obscure words is bad. As Stephen King said, “Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.” This is as true for fiction as it is for business copy.

26. Is a master of brevity. Any writer can spew out 1,000 words on a given topic. A great writer condenses the topic down to 300 powerful ones.

27. Knows how to go long. Brevity in business writing, while generally advantageous, is not always so. Certain types of content, such as landing pages for complex products, demand long copy. Again, any writer can spew out 1,000 words of drivel, but it’s the great writer who can compose 1,000 words of irresistible persuasion.

28. Understands the business world. Writers write well about what they know. Thus, a first-rate copywriter understands the business process, customer behavior and basic business concepts such as features and benefits.

29. Anticipates reader questions and concerns. Because great writers understand the business world, they are able to identify probable reactions from the target audience – and address them in the copy. In addition, this knowledge enables them to discard messaging points that are not pertinent. An ounce of anticipation is worth a pound of verbosity.

30. Recognizes gaps and weaknesses in the information or ideas being presented. Business savvy enables great writers to spot flaws in the case they are being tasked to make; their input can be enormously valuable to a firm’s sales and marketing leadership.

31. Plays nice with designers. Business copy is more than just cranked out text. It is an important component of a brochure, web page, slide presentation or some other form heavily influenced by design. Writers and designers must be flexible and patient when working together to hammer out the finished product.

32. Knows SEO. Copywriters need not be SEO experts, but they do need to know the basics of keywords, anchor text structure and a few other details. SEO comes into play in such things as text, headlines, subheads, Meta titles and Meta descriptions.

33. Muscles through writer’s block. Writing when inspiration is lacking is agonizing – in fact, it’s every writer’s nightmare. Great business writers have the ability to crank it out even when ideas are harder to come by than five-sided snowflakes.

34. Tells stories. Today’s content strategies have circled back to perhaps the oldest technique of all, storytelling. The ability to spin yarns is essential for case studies, landing pages, slide presentations, videos and a multitude of other forms.

35. Is observant. Writing without seeing the details is like playing solitaire with a 49-card deck. You can’t win.

36. Listens. Most great writers I know are better at listening than talking – maybe because writers are often introverts by nature. Listening is crucial to many aspects of business, including content creation, because it is the surest way to understand the needs of a company’s leadership and its customers.

37. Takes notes. Relying on memory alone, a writer forgets or misremembers most of what he or shehears and observes.

38. Thinks logically. Most business writing is aimed at influencing action – influencing prospects to buy, customers to stay, investors to invest, etc. Since business decisions are made in part based on compelling arguments, copywriters must be able to lay them out.

39. Writes with emotion. Because business decisions are also based on feelings, writers must be able to provoke an emotional response in many of their assignments. Warm prospects freeze when exposed to cold writing.

40. Reads enthusiastically. Great writers are great readers. Reading is to writers what exercise is to athletes.

41. Reads widely. Versatile and authoritative writers read all sorts of things – newspapers, novels, history, comics, or even washing instruction labels if nothing else is available.

42. Reads deeply. Great writers enjoy mastering a subject. The combination of depth and breadth of reading facilitates the versatility in form and style mentioned above.

43. Isn’t a desk jockey. Great copywriters aren’t just about reading and writing. Instead, they go out into the real world and talk to employees, customers and even competitors. Without this, they lose their feel – or never acquire it.

44. Borrows well. Creative copywriting is often an exercise in recognizing effective content and adapting it to the job at hand. Great writers are discriminating judges of talent.

45. Borrows professionally. Crediting a source in the form of a mention, a link and/or a formal citation is a necessary element of credible and creditable writing.

46. Has a mentor. Exceptional writers almost always speak highly of a teacher, an editor or a writer who inspired and taught them.

47. Is not blunt. Many writers tell it too much like it is. Great writers control this tendency.

48. Is not temperamental. Many writers have mood swings; perhaps this goes with the creative territory. Great copywriters manage this tendency to prevent it from interfering with their work.  

49. Is imaginative. Although in some business situations, imagination may be seen as a negative, employers should not come down too hard on copywriters who appear to be daydreaming or throw out lots of ideas.

50. Possesses a sense of humor. Sylvia Plath and Edgar Allan Poe were brilliant writers, but neither would be particularly effective or happy writing an infomercial script for miracle meat slicers. A lighthearted spirit helps writers plow through “boring” and “trivial” assignments, connect with readers and work well collaboratively.

Over to You

This is quite a long list, but I feel as though I’ve left things out. As a matter of fact, I’m not sure I’ve really captured the essence of a great copywriter in any sense at all. So here are a few questions.

  • What can you add to this list?
  • Are there items here you would remove?
  • What makes you a great writer?
  • What do you look for when hiring a writer?

Categories: Content MarketingHeadline WritingInbound MarketingSocial Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing Tips and Insights from a Big Boring Brand Reblogged. The author is Jeff Bullas.

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English: Infographic on how Social Media are b...

English: Infographic on how Social Media are being used, and how everything is changed by them. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Instagram

Instagram (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

General Electric

General Electric (Photo credit: twm1340)

General Electric Building (1931), New York

General Electric Building (1931), New York (Photo credit: cerfon)

General Electric Building (1931), New York

General Electric Building (1931), New York (Photo credit: cerfon)

Image representing YouTube as depicted in Crun...

Image via CrunchBase

Image representing IBM as depicted in CrunchBase

Image via CrunchBase

Social Media Marketing Tips and Insights from a Big Boring Brand

Social Media Marketing Tips and Insights from a Big Boring Brand

Many times the question is raised …”My product is boring, so how can I use social media to drive sales and create brand awareness?

Traditional businesses still often think that Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and  Instagram are for the teenagers, the under 30′s or the mommy bloggers.

Social media marketing is mostly seen as a the province of businesses that deal with consumers. The new reality is that “social media marketing is not about the channel but what goes into the channel – content! ”

Boring brands need to change their thinking

Business to business brands often have great content it’s just that they just aren’t used to publishing it to social networks. It requires a new way of thinking about social and it revolves around publishing content that engages.

There are many traditional brands that have what seems to be boring topics of conversation but are managing to be creative and innovative. These include IBM, Microsoft and General Electric.

Today we will have a closer look at a traditional business that understands innovation both with its business and how it uses social media. We will look at some social media marketing tips and insights into how GE  uses its “GE Reports” publishing portal and amplifies and leverages it with social networks.

1. General Electric

General Electric or “GE” is a big business that doesn’t sell sexy fashion or cool gadgets. It designs and creates big machines and lots of other stuff. Despite it being perceived from a distance as a big boring brand it is constantly innovating and experimenting with social media and new channels. This even includes Instagram, Pinterest and Viddy.

According to GE’s Linda Boff (The executive director of global digital marketing)  in an interview on Digiday,  social media is used by GE to have conversations with people.

These include

  • Consumers
  • Employees
  • Investors

It uses social media to tell stories about the impact of its technology and innovation on people.

GE’s main goal is engagement

GE’s social media metrics is focused on measuring engagement because that is the main goal of their social media activities. This includes capturing data and metrics on Facebook that looks at unique engagement rate. This provides insights into the size and health of their online community. They are also exploring the use of social CRM platforms to personalize the engagement.

The key tactic for driving engagement on social media

According to Linda Boff the key tactic to creating the most engagement with content is as follows.

“With respect to content, across nearly all platforms we’ve found that creative, visual content paired with strong calls-to-action drives the highest engagement”.

That is why you will see GE on the visual social media channels such as Viddy, Pinterest and Instagram which could maybe been seen as the wrong demographic for their audience.

How GE handles risk on social media

GE is in a lot of highly regulated businesses which includes, financial services, healthcare and energy. Brands often use the excuse of not participating on social media in highly regulated industries because it is seen as too big a legal risk to be publishing on social media. They fear that they will lose control of their messaging.

So how does GE solve this?

In a recent real time social media marketing campaign reported on Digiday, they assemble a team  that includes:

  • Strategist
  • Producer
  • Designer
  • Lawyer

This allows them to make fast decisions on both the content and the distribution. So if you are participating on social channels don’t let government or corporate regulation get in the way of participation.

The GE Social Publishing Portal

Their main portal for creating brand awareness is “GE Reports“. This is not about selling a product but selling the idea of innovation. This is much more engaging and allows them to tap into the emotion of storytelling.

What is the GE Report’s mission and goal?

The  mission: “To provide a simple no frills way of  way of communicating what is happening at GE”

The goal: “To be a resource for people who are interested in learning more about GE”

This publishing portal covers the main categories of the GE business spectrum.  It is about providing highly visual storytelling that includes:

  • Videos
  • Graphics
  • Photos

So even the GE Reports is focused on visual storytelling and visual engagement. Its not a website with long lengthy articles with walls of text. It’s about cool infographics, compelling YouTube videos and engaging images.

GE Reports

If you have a closer look inside the GE Report you will start to notice content that is far from boring.

The fastest ferry in the world

When creating content around your brand you should be looking for angles that will take your brand from dull to fascinating. You could write an article about a jet engine (A GE product) but what is much more interesting is a story about the world’s fastest ferry driven by jet engines from a 747. You need to look at publishing on social networks with a journalists and publishers eye and ear.

The facts that will capture your attention (and maybe provide and incentive to share the story) is that is can reach speeds of 67 miles per hour, carry 1,000 passengers and 150 cars.

The fastest ferry in the world

So how can you move your content from mundane to motivating?

The GE Social Networks

GE doesn’t shy away from participating on mainstream social networks that are often seen as the domain of business to consumer brands. Here are some of the ways and the social channels that they participate on.

Facebook

General Electric is about innovation and 3D printing is one of the latest trends in technology innovation. This is the latest featured content on their Facebook page. You will notice that is isn’t  about their product but explaining and educating people about how the 3D printing process works. It is about having conversations around the brand not about its products to drive engagement.

GE Facebook

Pinterest

But they are on Pinterest..that’s suppose to be where the mommy bloggers hang out! What GE has understood is that the visual nature of Pinterest drives high engagement. So they are constantly innovating and participating on new channels to find what works and doesn’t.

GE Badass machines Pinterest

Instagram

GE is also on Instagram. They often run competitions on Instagram and make the GE brand fun and personal.

GE Instagram

Twitter

GE is even on Twitter  and know how to have a bit of fun. Here is their take on Thanksgiving with a scientific twist. They maybe haven’t found Twitter to be as successful as the other networks and that is maybe because it is not as visual as Instagram or Pinterest. Maybe Twitters new image stream will change that. GE Twitter

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What idea could you try to sell?

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